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Online Book Club starts new book today: The Thirteenth Tale

Welcome Online Book Club,


Today we start a new book in our online book club, Find The Treasure. Our focus is on uplifting books and this book is The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

To join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right: Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Thirteenth Tale”

or just click on this link https://books-treasureortrash.com/find-the-treasure/?mingleforumaction=viewforum&f=3.0

 We hope you join us on this journey of discovery.

Product Description from Amazon

Sometimes, when you open the door to the past, what you confront is your destiny.
Reclusive author Vida Winter, famous for her collection of twelve enchanting stories, has spent the past six decades penning a series of alternate lives for herself. Now old and ailing, she is ready to reveal the truth about her extraordinary existence and the violent and tragic past she has kept secret for so long. Calling on Margaret Lea, a young biographer troubled by her own painful history, Vida disinters the life she meant to bury for good. Margaret is mesmerized by the author’s tale of gothic strangeness — featuring the beautiful and willful Isabelle, the feral twins Adeline and Emmeline, a ghost, a governess,a topiary garden and a devastating fire. Together, Margaret and Vida confront the ghosts that have haunted them while becoming, finally, transformed by the truth themselves.

Reviews from Amazon

Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com Review
Settle down to enjoy a rousing good ghost story with Diane Setterfield’s debut novel, The Thirteenth Tale. Setterfield has rejuvenated the genre with this closely plotted, clever foray into a world of secrets, confused identities, lies, and half-truths. She never cheats by pulling a rabbit out of a hat; this atmospheric story hangs together perfectly.
There are two heroines here: Vida Winter, a famous author, whose life story is coming to an end, and Margaret Lea, a young, unworldly, bookish girl who is a bookseller in her father’s shop. Vida has been confounding her biographers and fans for years by giving everybody a different version of her life, each time swearing it’s the truth. Because of a biography that Margaret has written about brothers, Vida chooses Margaret to tell her story, all of it, for the first time. At their initial meeting, the conversation begins:

“You have given nineteen different versions of your life story to journalists in the last two years alone.”
She [Vida] shrugged. “It’s my profession. I’m a storyteller.”
“I am a biographer, I work with facts.”
The game is afoot and Margaret must spend some time sorting out whether or not Vida is actually ready to tell the whole truth. There is more here of Margaret discovering than of Vida cooperating wholeheartedly, but that is part of Vida’s plan. The transformative power of truth informs the lives of both women by story’s end, and The Thirteenth Tale is finally and convincingly told. –Valerie Ryan –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
Former academic Setterfield pays tribute in her debut to Brontë and du Maurier heroines: a plain girl gets wrapped up in a dark, haunted ruin of a house, which guards family secrets that are not hers and that she must discover at her peril. Margaret Lea, a London bookseller’s daughter, has written an obscure biography that suggests deep understanding of siblings. She is contacted by renowned aging author Vida Winter, who finally wishes to tell her own, long-hidden, life story. Margaret travels to Yorkshire, where she interviews the dying writer, walks the remains of her estate at Angelfield and tries to verify the old woman’s tale of a governess, a ghost and more than one abandoned baby. With the aid of colorful Aurelius Love, Margaret puzzles out generations of Angelfield: destructive Uncle Charlie; his elusive sister, Isabelle; their unhappy parents; Isabelle’s twin daughters, Adeline and Emmeline; and the children’s caretakers. Contending with ghosts and with a (mostly) scary bunch of living people, Setterfield’s sensible heroine is, like Jane Eyre, full of repressed feeling—and is unprepared for both heartache and romance. And like Jane, she’s a real reader and makes a terrific narrator. That’s where the comparisons end, but Setterfield, who lives in Yorkshire, offers graceful storytelling that has its own pleasures. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
From Bookmarks Magazine
The Thirteenth Tale received a reported $1 million advance in the United States and an even greater one in Britain. That, combined with comparisons of Diane Setterfield’s storytelling techniques to that of the Brontës, makes this debut novel a publicity coup of sorts. Certainly, The Thirteenth Tale—a family drama, romance, bildungsroman, mystery, and ghost story—intrigued most critics. Yet not all agreed that the novel lives up to the hype. Dazzling writing, a suspenseful story-within-a-story, and rich plot twists made an imaginative story. Some reviewers, however, cited gaps in plotting, dull characters (especially the twins), and an unexceptional ending. In end, it’s Setterfield’s old-fashioned storytelling and love for literature that makes the novel stand out.
Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist
Margaret Lea, a bookish loner, is summoned to the home of Vida Winter, England’s most popular novelist, and commanded to write her biography. Miss Winter has been falsifying her life story and her identity for more than 60 years. Facing imminent death and feeling an unexplainable connection to Margaret, Miss Winter begins to spin a haunting, suspenseful tale of an old English estate, a devastating fire, twin girls, a governess, and a ghost. As Margaret carefully records Vida’s tale, she ponders her own family secrets. Her research takes her to the English moors to view a mansion’s ruins and discover an unexpected ending to Vida’s story. Readers will be mesmerized by this -story-within-a-story tinged with the eeriness of Rebecca and the willfulness of Jane Eyre. The author skillfully keeps the plot moving by unfurling a new twist in each chapter and leaves no strand untucked at the surprising and satisfying conclusion. A wholly original work told in the vein of all the best gothic classics. Lovers of books about book lovers will be enthralled. Kaite Mediatore
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Review
‘Beautifully written and highly intelligent. Blissful escapism for literate (and literary) females who love an old-fashioned story’ THE TIMES ‘A real treat…Like all the best first novels, this one seems to bulge with a lifetime’s hoarded inspirations. Setterfield litters the book with references to nineteenth-century gothic literature and other meta-textual winks and nudges. The effect is of a lit-crit parlour game, which only adds to the fun’ TIME OUT ‘Guiltily enjoyable’ MAIL ON SUNDAY ‘Whimsical, moving and consciously nostalgic, Diane Setterfield knows the limits of enchantment, even as she tries to break them’ TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT ‘Setterfield proves a mistress of the craft of storytelling and her musings about the pleasures of reading are beguiling’ GUARDIAN ‘Cleverly plotted, beautifully written homage to the classic romance mystery novel…It is a remarkable first novel, a book about the joy of books, a riveting multi-layered mystery that twists and turns, and weaves a quite magical spell for most of its length’ THE INDEPENDENT ‘A witty, entertaining and very satisfying read’ THE SPECTATOR ‘This bold, unusual debut is, as a Jane Austen character might have said, a vastly entertaining fiction’ DAILY MAIL ‘Make yourself a mug of cocoa and shut the curtains tight – a generous helping of gothic delight is about to be served’ DAILY EXPRESS ‘A remarkably compelling debut…This is an extraordinary, unusual and atmospheric story with a sense of timelessness about it. It is rare to be able to smell a book as well as read it, but this one is steeped in the aroma of old houses in remote places with strange faded furnishings and little natural light. It will appeal to anybody with a love of literature and a passion for the feel and smell of old books’ SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY ‘Brilliantly written – recommended’ EASY LIVING ‘Compelling page-turner’ WOMAN & HOME ‘a page-turner of a Gothic mystery’ SHE ‘A dark mystery in the vein of Daphne du Maurier about family secrets and the potency of storytelling’ THE LIST ‘The fiction that I will be most enthusiastically recommending to friends is Diane Setterfield’s The Thirteenth Tale. Much hyped, this has lived up to expectations; it is like Daphne du Maurier, Agatha Christie and the Brontes all rolled into one, which has to be a good thing’ BOOKSELLER ‘If you don’t mind drowning yourself in a captivating, beautifully written tale, go ahead and buy ‘The Thirteenth Tale. You won’t regret the purchase’ LITPUNDIT.COM ‘I can’t remember when I last enjoyed a book as much as I’ve enjoyed this one. WWW.THEBOOKBAG.CO.UK ‘An extraordinary story, full of twists and turns, spookiness and humour…As a debut novel, this is an impressive book and it is refreshing to read something that combines Gothic invention with realism so easily. For every fantastic plot twist there is a descriptive passage that catches the imagination completely. A wonderful book to settle down with on a Sunday afternoon: one that is both absorbing and fun’ WATERSTONES BOOKS QUARTERLY ‘The Thirteenth Tale is the sort of novel they don’t write any more, which makes it all the more welcome. Add to this Setterfield’s remarkable imagination coupled with her literate style and you have the makings of a modern classic’ YORKSHIRE EVE POST ‘Setterfield establishes, from the very first page, one of those narrative voices which you trust implicitly, warming to its calm understated authority’ SUNDAY TELEGRAPH ‘Setterfield writes evocatively and assuredly’ LITERARY REVIEW ‘This is an excellent emotional mystery which I found harder to put down every night!’ WOMAN’S OWN ‘Setterfield is a master of pacing’ THE SCOTSMAN ‘Diane Setterfield has a light lyric touch’ FINANCIAL TIMES ‘Start reading this on the bus and, I swear, you won’t only miss your stop, you might even lose the whole day’ COSMOPOLITAN – Great Reads of 2006 ‘The moorland romances of the Brontes and Daphne du Maurier are never far away from our vision of a perfect Christmas read. Draw up a chair, then, for debut novelist Diane Setterfield. It’s a windswept feast of abandoned babies, incestuous siblings and feral twins’ THE INDEPENDENT (Review) –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
About the Author
Diane Setterfield is a former academic, specializing in twentieth-century French literature. She lives in Yorkshire, England.

 

Posted by on November 16, 2012 in Book Club

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Online Book Club starts a new book today

Welcome Online Book Club,

Today we start a new book in our online book club, Find The Treasure. Our focus is on uplifting books and this book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

To join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right: Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”

or just click on this link https://books-treasureortrash.com/find-the-treasure/?mingleforumaction=viewforum&f=2.0

 We hope you join us on this journey of discovery.

Product Description from Amazon

From Amazon

Mark Haddon’s bitterly funny first novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, is a murder mystery of sorts–one told by an autistic version of Adrian Mole. Christopher John Francis Boone is a 15-year-old boy, mathematically gifted and socially hopeless, raised in a working-class home by parents who can barely cope with their child’s quirks. He takes everything that he sees (or is told) at face value, and is unable to sort out the strange behaviour of his elders and peers.Late one night, Christopher comes across his neighbour’s poodle, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork. Wellington’s owner finds him cradling her dead dog in his arms, and has him arrested. After spending a night in jail, Christopher resolves–against the objection of his father and neighbours–to discover just who has murdered Wellington. He is encouraged by Siobhan, a social worker at his school, to write a book about his investigations, and the result–quirkily illustrated, with each chapter given its own prime number–is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time.Haddon’s novel is a startling performance. This is the sort of book that could turn condescending, or exploitative, or overly sentimental, or grossly tasteless very easily, but Haddon navigates those dangers with a sureness of touch that is extremely rare among first-time novelists. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is original, clever, and genuinely moving: this one is a must-read. –Jack Illingworth –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Christopher Boone, the autistic 15-year-old narrator of this revelatory novel, relaxes by groaning and doing math problems in his head, eats red-but not yellow or brown-foods and screams when he is touched. Strange as he may seem, other people are far more of a conundrum to him, for he lacks the intuitive “theory of mind” by which most of us sense what’s going on in other people’s heads. When his neighbor’s poodle is killed and Christopher is falsely accused of the crime, he decides that he will take a page from Sherlock Holmes (one of his favorite characters) and track down the killer. As the mystery leads him to the secrets of his parents’ broken marriage and then into an odyssey to find his place in the world, he must fall back on deductive logic to navigate the emotional complexities of a social world that remains a closed book to him. In the hands of first-time novelist Haddon, Christopher is a fascinating case study and, above all, a sympathetic boy: not closed off, as the stereotype would have it, but too open-overwhelmed by sensations, bereft of the filters through which normal people screen their surroundings. Christopher can only make sense of the chaos of stimuli by imposing arbitrary patterns (“4 yellow cars in a row made it a Black Day, which is a day when I don’t speak to anyone and sit on my own reading books and don’t eat my lunch and Take No Risks”). His literal-minded observations make for a kind of poetic sensibility and a poignant evocation of character. Though Christopher insists, “This will not be a funny book. I cannot tell jokes because I do not understand them,” the novel brims with touching, ironic humor. The result is an eye-opening work in a unique and compelling literary voice.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
 

Posted by on October 18, 2012 in Book Club

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Online Book Club Starts Today

Welcome all,

Today we start our new online book club, Find The Treasure. Our focus is on uplifting books and our first book is Where We Belong by Emily Giffin

 

To join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right: Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “Where We Belong”

 

The first line reads “I know what they say about secrets.” The little I know about this book revolves around secrets, and this first line really sums it up and grabs the readers interest.  I am anxious to keep reading, to find out what happens next, and to see where this story is going to end.

We hope you join us on this journey of discovery.

Here are some editorial reviews as posted in Amazon

Editorial Reviews

 “In another surefire hit, [Giffin] serves up pathos, humor, and one doozy of a twist.” —Entertainment Weekly

“Sharply drawn characters and finely honed sensibility add up to a story that’s as bittersweet as an August evening.” —Family Circle

“Book clubs will have a field day with this one. Thorny mother-daughter relationships and secrets we keep from loved ones burn up the pages.” —USA Today

“After five charming relationship-themed hits, Emily Giffin had a lot to live up to with WHERE WE BELONG. Luckily, the author executes with a thoughtful finesse that makes this easily her best work yet. [WHERE WE BELONG] is that special type of story that takes priority over getting to bed on time. And the payoff is well worth it.” —Boston Globe

“Emily Giffin ranks as a grand master. Over the course of five best-selling novels, she has traversed the slippery slopes of true love, lost love, marriage, motherhood, betrayal, forgiveness and redemption that have led her to be called ‘a modern-day Jane Austen.’ With Giffin’s use of humor, honesty, originality and, like Austen, a biting social commentary, this modern-day ‘woman’s novel’ sits easily on nightstands and in beach bags. Even Austen would find it hard to put down.” —Chicago Sun-Times

“Emily Giffin’s new novel about the legacy of adoption, WHERE WE BELONG, imagines what happens when an 18-year-old girl tracks down her birth mother…the latest in a string of provocative, imaginative novels that began in 2004 with SOMETHING BORROWED. All the characters [here] are on a journey to find ‘where we belong,’ and Giffin knits together their journeys with a masterly hand.” —Seattle Times

“Emily Giffin’s WHERE WE BELONG is a literary Rorschach test. The book, while thoroughly entertaining, will also prod readers to examine choices they’ve made in their lives. It will compel them to muse about things they’d like to do over, to do differently, to do better…[and] gracefully examines themes of identity, family and forgiveness.” —Miami Herald

“Emily Giffin has a wonderful way with words. [WHERE WE BELONG] is an emotionally powerful story that will ring true with women who have given a child away and with those who grew up wondering where they came from. Giffin may be working with a premise and plot that is fairly simple, but there’s nothing lightweight about the emotional turbulence she creates.” —Ft. Worth Star-Telegram

“[Giffin] shows that real love is messy but meaningful in this delicious, easygoing read.” —American Way

“[Giffin’s] novels present tough moral dilemmas all related to love. And her latest, WHERE WE BELONG, is no exception and perhaps her best yet…It’s a classic Giffin tale, nuanced and messy and utterly addictive, with fully fleshed-out characters who face morally ambiguous choices that aren’t resolved in neat bows.” —Austin American-Statesman

“A breezy, yet compelling read.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Emily Giffin is back with another must-read summer novel!” —Harper’s Bazaar

“The next must-read book of the summer!” —Star

“WHERE WE BELONG is too suspenseful to be called chick lit and too relationship-centered to be labeled a thriller. But most readers will have little time to think of a genre for Emily Giffin’s latest novel as they race through this gripping story about the reunion of a high school senior and the woman who put her up for adoption 18 years earlier.” —Connecticut Post

“Giffin has a way of tugging on our heartstrings while still making us laugh out loud…[a] perfect recipe.” —Woman’s World

“Graceful and inviting prose, careful plotting and vivid characterizations…The coming together of two people who share a genetic heritage and little else is dramatically and emotionally risky. But Giffin makes the most of the opportunity, and WHERE WE BELONG had me riveted.” —Winston-Salem Journal

“The issue about secrets isn’t about keeping them. It’s the reveal and its consequences. That’s the challenge faced by the characters in Emily Giffin’s new, briskly paced…WHERE WE BELONG. Taking a somewhat more somber tone than she did in her [previous] bestselling novels, Giffin’s approach and style mature in this latest effort.” —Philadelphia Inquirer

“Breezy and fun, this is definitely one for the beach bag!” —All You magazine

“Giffin’s latest will make you shed a few tears – and call your mom.” —Ladies Home Journal

“You’re sure to spy lots of pale-orange book covers at the beach this summer, as Emily Giffin releases her latest in a series of successful reads. The book has heart, meat and realistic characters.” —am New York

“[WHERE WE BELONG] delivers the readable, addicting prose we have all come to love [but] delves deeper than ever before, showing that the author is capable of making her signature style work with topics beyond typical relationships. Through Marian, her daughter and the rest of those affected by Marian’s decisions, the author beautifully tackles the complex issues of sex, abortion, adoption and the difficult decisions that go along with each.” —Woodbury magazine

“A satisfying and entertaining read. Giffin is a gifted storyteller [and] writes smart, snappy prose that elevates this novel.” —Vancouver Sun

Believable characters, [a] page-turning plot and [an] unblinking look at the choices we make as women.” —WeightWatchers magazine

To Purchase: “Where We Belong” from Amazon, click here or on picture above

 

Posted by on September 20, 2012 in Book Club, Helpful Hints

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