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New Book in our Online Book Club: The Hundred-Foot Journey by Richard C. Morais


Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club

Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we have started reading a new book, The Hundred Foot Journey by Richard C. Morais. This book will soon be coming out in a movie starring, Helen Mirren. On the surface, the story is about a restaurant, however underneath it is about life and relationships.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Hundred Foot Journey”

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

Book details as outlined on Amazon.com

“Soon to be a major motion picture starring Helen Mirren and Om Puri, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, and produced by Oprah Winfrey, Steven Spielberg, Juliet Blake, DreamWorks Studios, and Participant Media.

“That skinny Indian teenager has that mysterious something that comes along once a generation. He is one of those rare chefs who is simply born. He is an artist.”

And so begins the rise of Hassan Haji, the unlikely gourmand who recounts his life’s journey in Richard Morais’s charming novel, The Hundred-Foot Journey. Lively and brimming with the colors, flavors, and scents of the kitchen, The Hundred-Foot Journey is a succulent treat about family, nationality, and the mysteries of good taste.

Born above his grandfather’s modest restaurant in Mumbai, Hassan first experienced life through intoxicating whiffs of spicy fish curry, trips to the local markets, and gourmet outings with his mother. But when tragedy pushes the family out of India, they console themselves by eating their way around the world, eventually settling in Lumière, a small village in the French Alps.

The boisterous Haji family takes Lumière by storm. They open an inexpensive Indian restaurant opposite an esteemed French relais—that of the famous chef Madame Mallory—and infuse the sleepy town with the spices of India, transforming the lives of its eccentric villagers and infuriating their celebrated neighbor. Only after Madame Mallory wages culinary war with the immigrant family, does she finally agree to mentor young Hassan, leading him to Paris, the launch of his own restaurant, and a slew of new adventures.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is about how the hundred-foot distance between a new Indian kitchen and a traditional French one can represent the gulf between different cultures and desires. A testament to the inevitability of destiny, this is a fable for the ages—charming, endearing, and compulsively readable.”

 

Posted by on July 3, 2014 in Book Club, Drama

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The Invention of Wings is the next book in the Online Book Club


The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd is the next book in our Online Book Club. We are reading this book from February 22 until March 31. This should be a great book, because it is by the same author who brought us The Secret Lives of Bees and it is a story about two incredible women.  This looks to be an uplifting story, and if it is anything like The Secret Lives of Bees.

To join us in reading this book, or to share your thoughts on the book club, click on this link http://books-treasureortrash.com/find-the-treasure/

“A remarkable novel that heightened my sense of what it meant to be a woman – slave or free. . .will resonate with anyone who has ever struggled to find her power and her voice. . .Sue Monk Kidd has written a conversation changer.  It is impossible to read this book and not come away thinking differently about our status as women and about all the unsung heroines who played a role in getting us to where we are.”—Oprah Winfrey, O The Oprah Magazine

This is a summary of the book from Sue Monk Kidd’s website:

The Invention of Wings

Overview

  • Published by Viking, January 7, 2014
  • Selected for Oprah’s Book Club 2.0
  • A New York Times #1 Bestseller

From the celebrated author of The Secret Life of Bees: a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world.

Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimkes’ daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Posted by on February 22, 2014 in Book Club, Book Review, Drama

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The Signature of All Things is the next book in the Online Book Club


Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club

Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert. This historical fiction spans almost two centuries, through the age of enlightenment and into the industrial revolution. The story covers the adventures of one family. Henry is the founder, and he is also a successful and intelligent botanist who becomes wealthy. Alma is his daughter and she not only carries on the family tradition, but she also reaches far past it and in the process gets drawn into the realm of the mystical.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Signature of All Things”

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

Book details as outlined on Amazon.com

A glorious, sweeping novel of desire, ambition, and the thirst for knowledge, from the # 1 New York Times bestselling author of Eat, Pray, Love and Committed

In The Signature of All Things, Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction, inserting her inimitable voice into an enthralling story of love, adventure and discovery. Spanning much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the novel follows the fortunes of the extraordinary Whittaker family as led by the enterprising Henry Whittaker—a poor-born Englishman who makes a great fortune in the South American quinine trade, eventually becoming the richest man in Philadelphia. Born in 1800, Henry’s brilliant daughter, Alma (who inherits both her father’s money and his mind), ultimately becomes a botanist of considerable gifts herself. As Alma’s research takes her deeper into the mysteries of evolution, she falls in love with a man named Ambrose Pike who makes incomparable paintings of orchids and who draws her in the exact opposite direction—into the realm of the spiritual, the divine, and the magical. Alma is a clear-minded scientist; Ambrose a utopian artist—but what unites this unlikely couple is a desperate need to understand the workings of this world and the mechanisms behind all life.

Exquisitely researched and told at a galloping pace, The Signature of All Things soars across the globe—from London to Peru to Philadelphia to Tahiti to Amsterdam, and beyond. Along the way, the story is peopled with unforgettable characters: missionaries, abolitionists, adventurers, astronomers, sea captains, geniuses, and the quite mad. But most memorable of all, it is the story of Alma Whittaker, who—born in the Age of Enlightenment, but living well into the Industrial Revolution—bears witness to that extraordinary moment in human history when all the old assumptions about science, religion, commerce, and class were exploding into dangerous new ideas. Written in the bold, questing spirit of that singular time, Gilbert’s wise, deep, and spellbinding tale is certain to capture the hearts and minds of readers.

 

 

Posted by on November 2, 2013 in Book Club, Historical Fiction

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The Aviator’s Wife is the next book in our Online Book Club


Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club

Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin. This historical fiction gives a glimpse into the life of an amazing woman who lived in the shadow of Charles Lindbergh.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Aviator’s Wife”

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

 

Book Description from Amazon.com

Publication Date: January 15, 2013
In the spirit of Loving Frank and The Paris Wife, acclaimed novelist Melanie Benjamin pulls back the curtain on the marriage of one of America’s most extraordinary couples: Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh.“The history [is] exhilarating. . . . The Aviator’s Wife soars.”USA Today

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
 
When Anne Morrow, a shy college senior with hidden literary aspirations, travels to Mexico City to spend Christmas with her family, she meets Colonel Charles Lindbergh, fresh off his celebrated 1927 solo flight across the Atlantic. Enthralled by Charles’s assurance and fame, Anne is certain the aviator has scarcely noticed her. But she is wrong. Charles sees in Anne a kindred spirit, a fellow adventurer, and her world will be changed forever. The two marry in a headline-making wedding. In the years that follow, Anne becomes the first licensed female glider pilot in the United States. But despite this and other major achievements, she is viewed merely as the aviator’s wife. The fairy-tale life she once longed for will bring heartbreak and hardships, ultimately pushing her to reconcile her need for love and her desire for independence, and to embrace, at last, life’s infinite possibilities for change and happiness.

Praise for The Aviator’s Wife

“Anne Morrow Lindbergh narrates the story of the Lindberghs’ troubled marriage in all its triumph and tragedy.”USA Today

“[This novel] will fascinate history buffs and surprise those who know of her only as ‘the aviator’s wife.’ ”—People
 
“It’s hard to quit reading this intimate historical fiction.”—The Dallas Morning News
 
“Utterly unforgettable.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“An intimate examination of the life and emotional mettle of Anne Morrow.”The Washington Post

“A story of both triumph and pain that will take your breath away.”—Kate Alcott, author of The Dressmaker
 
“Melanie Benjamin inhabits Anne Morrow Lindbergh completely, freeing her from the shadows of her husband’s stratospheric fame.”—Isabel Wolff, author of A Vintage Affair

 

Posted by on September 3, 2013 in Book Club, Historical Fiction

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The Snow Child is the next book in our Online Book Club


Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club

Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey. This book has a fantastical twist as it examines transformation. The focus of our book club is on uplifting books and The Snow Child is the story of a childless couple who find a young girl in the Alaskan wilderness, the day after they make a snow child from the first snow fall of the year.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Snow Child”

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

Book Description and Reviews as posted on Amazon.com

Alaska, 1920: a brutal place to homestead, and especially tough for recent arrivals Jack and Mabel. Childless, they are drifting apart–he breaking under the weight of the work of the farm; she crumbling from loneliness and despair. In a moment of levity during the season’s first snowfall, they build a child out of snow. The next morning the snow child is gone–but they glimpse a young, blonde-haired girl running through the trees.

This little girl, who calls herself Faina, seems to be a child of the woods. She hunts with a red fox at her side, skims lightly across the snow, and somehow survives alone in the Alaskan wilderness. As Jack and Mabel struggle to understand this child who could have stepped from the pages of a fairy tale, they come to love her as their own daughter. But in this beautiful, violent place things are rarely as they appear, and what they eventually learn about Faina will transform all of them.

Review

“Ivey’s prose is beautiful and precise…Magical…As real and mysterious as winter’s first snowflake.” (Buzzy Jackson, Boston Globe )”The real magic of The Snow Child is that it’s never as simple as it seems, never moves exactly in the direction you think it must…Sad as the story often is, with its haunting fairy-tale ending, what I remember best are the scenes of unabashed joy.” (Ron Charles, Washington Post )

“Full of wonder, longing, hope, pain, and beauty…The Snow Child will keep you frozen in its spell until the very last word.” (Sarah Willis, Cleveland Plain Dealer )

“Ivey sets up the two most powerful forces in any story: fear on the one hand, potential for the miraculous on the other.” (Susan Salter Reynolds, Newsday )

“A magical yet brutally realistic tale.” (Karen Holt, O, the Oprah Magazine )

“Bewitching.” (Meganne Fabrega, Minneapolis Star Tribune )

“Captivating.” (San Francisco Chronicle )

“Spellbinding.” (Gill Hudson, Reader’s Digest )

“If Willa Cather and Gabriel Garcia Marquez had collaborated on a book, THE SNOW CHILD would be it. It is a remarkable accomplishment — a combination of the most delicate, ethereal, fairytale magic and the harsh realities of homesteading in the Alaskan wilderness in 1918. Stunningly conceived, beautifully told, this story has the intricate fragility of a snowflake and the natural honesty of the dirt beneath your feet, the unnerving reality of a dream in the night. It fascinates, it touches the heart. It gallops along even as it takes time to pause at the wonder of life and the world in which we live. And it will stir you up and stay with you for a long, long time.” (Robert Goolrick,New York Times bestselling author of A Reliable Wife )

“THE SNOW CHILD is enchanting from beginning to end. Ivey breathes life into an old tale and makes it as fresh as the season’ s first snow. Simply lovely.” (Keith Donohue, New York Times bestselling author of The Stolen Child)

“A transporting tale . . . an amazing achievement.” (Sena Jeter Naslund, New York Times bestselling author of Ahab’s Wife )

“THE SNOW CHILD is a vivid story of isolation and hope on the Alaska frontier, a narrative of struggle with the elements and the elemental conflict between one’s inner demons and dreams, and the miracle of human connection and community in a spectacular, dangerous world. You will not soon forget this story of learning to accept the gifts that fate and love can bring.” (Robert Morgan, author of Gap Creek )

“Eowyn Ivey’s exquisite debut transports the reader away to a world almost out of time, into a fairytale destined to both chill and delight. Her portrayal of an untamed Alaska is so detailed you can feel the snowflakes on your own eyelashes, even as her characters’ desperate quest for, and ultimate redemption by, love will warm your heart.” (Melanie Benjamin, author of Alice I Have Been )

“Magical, yes, but THE SNOW CHILD is also satisfyingly realistic in its depiction of 1920s homestead-era Alaska and the people who settled there, including an older couple bound together by resilient love. Eowyn Ivey’s poignant debut novel grabbed me from the very first pages and made me wish we had more genre-defying Alaska novels like this one. Inspired by a fairy tale, it nonetheless contains more depth and truth than so many books set in this land of extremes.” (Andromeda Romano-Lax, author of The Spanish Bow )

“This book is real magic, shot through from cover to cover with the cold, wild beauty of the Alaskan frontier. Eowyn Ivey writes with all the captivating delicacy of the snowfalls she so beautifully describes.” (Ali Shaw, author ofThe Girl with Glass Feet )

About the Author

Eowyn LeMay Ivey was raised in Alaska and continues to live there with her husband and two daughters. She received her BA in journalism and minor in creative writing through the honors program at Western Washington University, studied creative nonfiction at the University of Alaska Anchorage graduate program, and worked for nearly 10 years as an award-winning reporter at the Frontiersman newspaper. This is her first novel.
 

Posted by on July 3, 2013 in Book Club, Drama

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The Book Thief is the next book in our Online Book Club


Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club

Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. The focus of our book club is on uplifting books and The Book Thief is the story of a young girl who finds solace in books.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Book Thief

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

Book Description per Amazon.com

Release date: September 11, 2007
It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement before he is marched to Dachau.This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.

Some Reviews as posted on Amazon.com

Review

“Brilliant and hugely ambitious…Some will argue that a book so difficult and sad may not be appropriate for teenage readers…Adults will probably like it (this one did), but it’s a great young-adult novel…It’s the kind of book that can be life-changing, because without ever denying the essential amorality and randomness of the natural order, The Book Thief offers us a believable hard-won hope…The hope we see in Liesel is unassailable, the kind you can hang on to in the midst of poverty and war and violence. Young readers need such alternatives to ideological rigidity, and such explorations of how stories matter. And so, come to think of it, do adults.” New York Times, May 14, 2006The Book Thief is unsettling and unsentimental, yet ultimately poetic. Its grimness and tragedy run through the reader’s mind like a black-and-white movie, bereft of the colors of life. Zusak may not have lived under Nazi domination, but The Book Thief deserves a place on the same shelf with The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel’s Night. It seems poised to become a classic.”
– USA Today

“Zusak doesn’t sugarcoat anything, but he makes his ostensibly gloomy subject bearable the same way Kurt Vonnegut did in Slaughterhouse-Five: with grim, darkly consoling humor.”
– Time Magazine

“Elegant, philosophical and moving…Beautiful and important.” 
– Kirkus Reviews, Starred
“This hefty volume is an achievement…a challenging book in both length
and subject…”
– Publisher’s Weekly, Starred”One of the most highly anticipated young-adult books in years.”
– The Wall Street Journal

 

Posted by on May 22, 2013 in Book Club

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The Outside Boy is the next book in the Online Book Club

Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club


Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Outside Boy by Jeanine Cummins. The focus of our book club is on uplifting books and The Outside Boy seems to include an uplifting tale about young Irish gypsy  boy. While travelling, his Grandda dies and this starts him on the road to change and a search to find belonging. 

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Language of Flowers

or just click on this link Find the Treasure

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

Editorial Reviews from Amazon.com

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Christy, nearly 12, is an Irish Traveller, a Pavee, a child of motion who, with his family, journeys restlessly from town to town, never staying in any place long enough to call it home. But when his beloved Grandda dies, family secrets begin to spill out, and things begin to change, perhaps irrevocably. Set in Ireland in 1959, Cummins’ first novel (she’s also the author of the memoir A Rip in Heaven, 2004) is a deeply moving and elegiac look at a vanishing culture. Told in Christy’s vernacular but often poetic first-person voice, The Outside Boy is gorgeously written and an implicit celebration of Irish storytelling. And it offers a convincing and evocative look at a way of life little known or understood by the many foreign to it. Though Cummins’ treatment of the Pavee may sometimes seem idealized, she is quick to acknowledge their occasional petty thefts and tradition of mooching. Her overriding, beautifully realized theme is larger than that, however: it is the universal desire to find a place where one belongs and people—whether one’s own family or as-yet-unknown others—whose presence provides essential comfort, contentment, and completion. –Michael Cart
 

Posted by on April 24, 2013 in Book Club

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The Language of Flowers is the next book in the Online Book Club

Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club


Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, a New York Times bestseller, The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. Our Focus is on uplifting books and The Language of Flowers seems to include an uplifting tale about an eighteen year old girl, Victoria Jones. She was raised in the welfare system, and is now out on her own with nowhere to go. But her love of flowers allows her to connect with others. However a painful secret from her past might be the link for her to finally find happiness, if she is only willing to take the risk.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Language of Flowers

or just click on this link Find the Treasure

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

 

Author Q and A from Amazon.com

Q: What is the language of flowers?

A: The Victorian language of flowers began with the publication of Le Language des Fleurs, written by Charlotte de Latour and printed in Paris in 1819. To create the book–which was a list of flowers and their meanings–de Latour gathered references to flower symbolism throughout poetry, ancient mythology and even medicine. The book spawned the science known as floriography, and between 1830 and 1880, hundreds of similar floral dictionaries were printed in Europe and America.

In The Language of Flowers, Victoria learns about this language as a young girl from her prospective adoptive mother Elizabeth. Elizabeth tells her that years ago, people communicated through flowers; and if a man gave a young lady a bouquet of flowers, she would race home and try to decode it like a secret message. So he would have to choose his flowers carefully.

Q: Where did you come up with the idea to have Victoria express herself through flowers?

A: I’ve always loved the language of flowers. I discovered Kate Greenaway’s Language of Flowers in a used bookstore when I was 16, and couldn’t believe it was such a well-kept secret. How could something so beautiful and romantic be virtually unknown? When I started thinking about the book I wanted to write, Victoria and the language of flowers came to me simultaneously. I liked the complication of a young woman who has trouble connecting with others communicating through a forgotten language that almost no one understands.

Q: Why does Victoria decide to create her own flower dictionary, and what role does it come to play in the novel?

A: In many ways, Victoria exists entirely on the periphery of society. So much is out of the scope of her understanding–how to get a job, how to make a friend, even how to have a conversation. But in the world of flowers, with their predictable growing habits and “non-negotiable” meanings, Victoria feels safe, comfortable, even at home. All this changes when she learns that there is more than one definition for the yellow rose–and then, through research, realizes there is more than one definition for almost every flower. She feels her grasp on the one aspect of life she believed to be solid dissolving away beneath her. In an effort to “re-order” the universe, Victoria begins to photograph and create her own dictionary, determined to never have a flower-inspired miscommunication. She decides to share that information with others–a decision that brings with it the possibility of love, connection, career, and community.

I understand Victoria’s impulse completely, and I included a dictionary in the back of the book for the same reason. If readers are inspired to send messages through flowers, I wanted there to be a complete, concise, relevant and consistent list of meanings for modern communication.

Q: How does The Language of Flowers challenge and reconfigure our concepts of family and motherhood?

A: One of my favorite books is Rainer Maria Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet. In it, Rilke writes: “It is also good to love: because love is difficult. For one human being to love another human being: that is perhaps the most difficult task that has been entrusted to us, the ultimate task, the final test and proof, the work for which all other work is merely preparation.”

To love is difficult. To be a mother is difficult. To be a mother, alone, with few financial resources and no emotional support, is so difficult as to be nearly impossible. Yet society expects us to be able to do it, and as mothers, we expect ourselves to be able to do it as well. Our standards for motherhood are so high that many of us harbor intense, secret guilt for every harsh word we speak to our children; every negative thought that enters our minds. The pressure is so powerful that many of us never speak aloud about our challenges–especially emotional ones–because to do so would be to risk being viewed as a failure or, worse, a danger to the very children we love more than anything in the world.

With Victoria and Elizabeth, I hope to allow the reader a window inside the minds of mothers who are trying to do what is best for their children but who lack the support, resources, and/or self-confidence to succeed. The results are heartbreaking for so many mothers who find themselves unable to raise their children. It is my belief that we could prevent much child abuse and neglect if we as a society recognized the intense challenge of motherhood and offered more support for mothers who want desperately to love and care for their children.

Q: The Language of Flowers sheds light on the foster care system in our country, something with which many of us are not intimately acquainted. Did you always know you wanted to write a story about a foster child?

A: I’ve always had a passion for working with young people. As my work began to focus on youth in foster care–and I eventually became a foster parent myself–I became aware of the incredible injustice of the foster care system in our country: children moving from home to home, being separated from siblings, and then being released into the world on their eighteenth birthday with little support or services. Moreover, I realized that this injustice was happening virtually unnoticed. The same sensationalized stories appear in the media over and over again: violent kids, greedy foster parents, the occasional horrific child death or romanticized adoption–but the true story of life inside the system is one that is much more complex and emotional–and it is a story that is rarely told. Foster children and foster parents, like children and adults everywhere, are trying to love and be loved, and to do the best they can with the emotional and physical resources they have. Victoria is a character that people can connect with on an emotional level–at her best and at her worst–which I hope gives readers a deeper understanding of the realities of foster care.

Q: Victoria is such a complex and memorable character. She has so much to contribute to the world, but has so much trouble with love and forgiveness, particularly toward herself. Is she based on someone you know or have known in real life?

A: People often ask me if I drew inspiration for the character of Victoria from our foster son Tre’von, but Victoria is about as different from Tre’von as two people could ever be. Tre’von’s strength is his openness–he has a quick smile, a big heart, and a social grace that puts everyone around him at ease. At fourteen, running away from home barefoot on a cold January night, he had the wisdom and sense of self-preservation to knock on the door of the nearest fire station. When he was placed in foster care, he immediately began to reach out to his teachers and his principal, creating around himself a protective community of love and support.

Victoria is clearly different. She is angry and afraid, yet desperately hopeful; qualities I saw in many of the young people I worked with throughout the years. Though Victoria is entirely fictional, I did draw inspiration in bits and pieces from foster children I have known. One young woman in particular, who my husband and I mentored many years ago, was fiery and focused and distrusting and unpredictable in a manner similar to Victoria. Her history was intense: a number on her birth certificate where a name should have been; more foster homes than she could count. Still, she was resilient, beautiful, smart, and funny. We loved her completely, and she did her best to sabotage it, over and over again. To this day my husband and I regret that we couldn’t find a way to connect with her and become the stable parents she deserved.

Q: The notion of second chances plays a major role in The Language of Flowers for many of the characters. Does this in any way relate to your personal advocacy work with emancipating foster youth?

A: As my four-year old daughter says to me on a regular basis: “Mommy, you aren’t perfect.” We all make mistakes, and we all need second chances. For youth in foster care, these mistakes are often purposeful–if not consciously so; a way to test the strength of a bond and establish trust in a new parent. A friend of mine called recently, after a year of mentoring a sixteen year-old boy, completely distraught. The young man had lied to him, and it was a major lie, one that put him in danger. My friend, in his anger, said things he regretted. My response was this: good. Your response might not have been perfect, but it was real and your concern was clear. As long as he was still committed to the young man (which he was), it didn’t so much matter what my friend had said or done; what mattered was what he did next. It mattered that he showed his mentee, through words and actions, that he still loved him, and that the young man’s mistake couldn’t change that.

Q: The Language of Flowers is one of those stories that will stay with its readers for a very long time. What lasting impression do you wish the book to leave them?

I believe that people are spurred into action when they both see the injustice of a situation and the possibility for change. With The Language of Flowers I tried to write a book that was honest and true, but hopeful enough to inspire people to act. Each year, nearly 20,000 young people emancipate from the foster care system, many of them with nowhere to go and no one to go to for support. I am launching a non-profit with the goal to connect every emancipating foster child to a community–a book club, a women’s club, a church group–to support them through the transition to adulthood and beyond. It is my hope that readers everywhere will read my book and become inspired to partner with emancipating young people in their own communities.

Q: If you were to represent yourself with a bouquet, which flowers would you choose and why?

A: Helioptrope (devoted affection), Black-Eyed Susan (justice), Hawthorn (hope), Liatris (I will try again), Lisianthus (appreciation), and Moss (maternal love). These flowers represent how I am–devoted, affectionate, maternal, and grateful–and also how I want to be–hopeful, determined, and constantly working for justice. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

 

Posted by on March 24, 2013 in Book Club

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The Chaperone is the next book in the Online Book Club

Welcome all book lovers to our Online Book Club


Today at Find The Treasure, our Online Book club, we start reading a new book, The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty. Our Focus is on uplifting books and The Chaperone looks as though it will be a great period piece that took place in 1922. It is an interesting story about women helping and learning from each other.

To Join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right. Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “The Chaperone

or just click on this link http://books-treasureortrash.com/find-the-treasure/?mingleforumaction=viewforum&f=6.0

We hope you join us and we look forward to hearing all your comments and feedback.

 

Editorial Reviews from Amazon.com

Review

The Chaperone is the enthralling story of two women . . . and how their unlikely relationship changed their lives. . . . In this layered and inventive story, Moriarty raises profound questions about family, sexuality, history, and whether it is luck or will—or a sturdy combination of the two—that makes for a wonderful life.”—O, The Oprah Magazine

“In her new novel, The Chaperone, Laura Morirty treats this golden age with an evocative look at the early life of silent-film icon Louise Brooks, who in 1922 leaves Wichita, Kansas, for New York City in the company of 36-year-old chaperone, Cora Carlisle. . . . A mesmerizing take on women in this pivotal era.”—Vogue

“With her shiny black bob and milky skin, Louise Brooks epitomized silent-film glamour. But in Laura Moriarty’s engaging new novel The Chaperone, Brooks is just a hyper-precocious and bratty 15-year-old, and our protagonist, 36-year-old Cora Carlisle, has the not-easy mission of keeping the teenager virtuous while on a trip from their native Kansas to New York City. After a battle of wills, there’s a sudden change of destiny for both women, with surprising and poignant results.”—Entertainment Weekly“Throughout The Chaperone, her fourth and best novel, Laura Moriarty mines first-rate fiction from the tension between a corrupting coastal media and the ideal of heart-of-America morality. . . . . Brooks’s may be the novel’s marquee name, but the story’s heart is Cora’s. With much sharpness but great empathy, Moriarty lays bare the settled mindset of this stolid, somewhat fearful woman—and the new experiences that shake that mindset up.”—San Francisco Weekly

“Film star Louise Brooks was a legend in her time, but the real lead of The Chaperone is Cora Carlise, Brooks’ 36-year-old chaperone for her first visit to New York City in 1922. As Cora struggles to tame Louise’s free spirit, she finds herself moving past the safety of her own personal boundaries. In this fictional account of Cora and Louise’s off-and-on relationship, Laura Moriarty writes with grace and compassion about life’s infinite possibilities for change and, ultimately, happiness.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune

“When silent film star Louise Brooks was a sexually provocative and headstrong 15-year-old from Kansas, she traveled with a chaperone to new York City to attend dance school.  In this fascinating historical novel, her minder, Cora, struggles to keep her charge within the bounds of propriety but finds herself questioning the confines of her own life. Thorough Cora the world of early 20th-century America comes alive, and her personal triumphs become cause for celebration.”—People

“Captivating and wise . . . In The Chaperone, Moriarty gives us a historically detailed and nuanced portrayal of the social upheaval that spilled into every corner of American life by 1922. . . . [An] inventive and lovely Jazz Age story.”—Washington Post

“#1 Summer 2012 novel.”—The Christian Science Monitor

“A fun romp.”—Good Housekeeping

“Devour it.”—Marie Claire

“The novel is captivating, and the last lines about Cora (you might think I’m giving everything away, but I’m not giving anything away—the story rolls through changes in terrain so subtle that it’s like a train from Wichita to New York and back) capsulate it all, revealing the richness of the saga.”—The Daily Beast

“The Chaperone,” an enchanting, luminous new novel by Laura Moriarty, fictionalizes the tale of the very real caretaker who accompanied a 15-year-old Louise Brooks on the first leg of her journey to silent-movie stardom. . . . Moriarty is a lovely writer, warm and wise.”—Cleveland Plain Dealer

“It is [Louise Brooks’s] endearing and surprising companion Cora Carlisle—a sharply drawn creating—who is the heart and soul of this stirring story.”—Family Circle

“Captivating and wise.”—Newsday

 

“While Louise lends The Chaperone a dose of fire, the novel’s heart is its heroine, who has a tougher time swimming in the seas of early-20th-century America than her ward does. As the story carries on, Moriarty’s greatest strength proves to be her ability to seamlessly weave together Cora’s present, future and colorful past.”—Time Out

“Set to be the hit of the beach read season.”—Matchbook
“The challenges of historical fiction are plentiful—how to freely imagine a person who really lived, how to impart modern sensibility to a bygone era, how to do your research without exactly showing your research. And yet, when this feat is achieved artfully (we’re talking Loving Frank or Arthur and George artfully), it can transport a reader to another time and place. Laura Moriarty’s new novel, The Chaperone, falls into this category.”—Bookpage

“It’s impossible not to be completely drawn in by The Chaperone. Laura Moriarty has delivered the richest and realest possible heroine in Cora Carlisle, a Wichita housewife who has her mind and heart blown wide open, and steps—with uncommon courage—into the fullness of her life. What a beautiful book. I loved every page.”—Paula McLain, author of The Paris Wife

“What a charming, mesmerizing, transporting novel! The characters are so fully realized that I felt I was right there alongside them. A beautiful clarity marks both the style and structure of The Chaperone.”—Sena Jeter Naslund, author of Ahab’s Wife and Adam & Eve

The Chaperone is the best kind of historical fiction, transporting you to another time and place, but even more importantly delivering a poignant story about people so real, you’ll miss and remember them long after you close the book.”—Jenna Blum, author of Those Who Save Us and The Stormchasers

About the Author

Laura Moriarty is the author of The Center of EverythingThe Rest of Her Life, and While I’m Falling.  She lives in Lawrence, Kansas.
 

Posted by on March 1, 2013 in Book Club, Historical Fiction

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Wild is the next book in the Online Book Club

Welcome Online Book Club,


Today we start a new book in our online book club, Find The Treasure. Our focus is on uplifting books and this book is “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed

To join our discussion, please click on the page tab on the right: Find the Treasure – Online Book Forum, and then click on “Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail”

or just click on this link http://books-treasureortrash.com/find-the-treasure/?mingleforumaction=viewforum&f=4.0

 We hope you join us on this journey of discovery.

 

Editorial Reviews from Amazon

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Best Books of the Month, March 2012: At age 26, following the death of her mother, divorce, and a run of reckless behavior, Cheryl Strayed found herself alone near the foot of the Pacific Crest Trail–inexperienced, over-equipped, and desperate to reclaim her life. Wild tracks Strayed’s personal journey on the PCT through California and Oregon, as she comes to terms with devastating loss and her unpredictable reactions to it. While readers looking for adventure or a naturalist’s perspective may be distracted by the emotional odyssey at the core of the story, Wild vividly describes the grueling life of the long-distance hiker, the ubiquitous perils of the PCT, and its peculiar community of wanderers. Others may find her unsympathetic–just one victim of her own questionable choices. But Strayed doesn’t want sympathy, and her confident prose stands on its own, deftly pulling both threads into a story that inhabits a unique riparian zone between wilderness tale and personal-redemption memoir. –Jon Foro


From Author Cheryl Strayed

Oprah and Cheryl StrayedOprah with Cheryl Strayed, author of Book Club 2.0’s inaugural selection, Wild.

I wrote the last line of my first book, Torch, and then spent an hour crying while lying on a cool tile floor in a house on a hot Brazilian island. After I finished my second book,Wild, I walked alone for miles under a clear blue sky on an empty road in the Oregon Outback. I sat bundled in my coat on a cold patio at midnight staring up at the endless December stars after completing my third book, Tiny Beautiful Things. There are only a handful of other days in my life–my wedding, the births of my children–that I remember as vividly as those solitary days on which I finished my books. The settings and situations were different, but the feeling was the same: an overwhelming mix of joy and gratitude, humility and relief, pride and wonder. After much labor, I’d made this thing. A book. Though it wasn’t technically that yet.

The real book came later–after more work, but this time it involved various others, including agents, publishers, editors, designers, and publicists, all of whose jobs are necessary but sometimes indecipherable to me. They’re the ones who transformed the thousands of words I’d privately and carefully conjured into something that could be shared with other people. “I wrote this!” I exclaimed in amazement when I first held each actual, physical book in my hands. I wasn’t amazed that it existed; I was amazed by what its existence meant: that it no longer belonged to me.

Two months before Wild was published I stood on a Mexican beach at sunset with my family assisting dozens of baby turtles on their stumbling journey across the sand, then watching as they disappeared into the sea. The junction between writer and author is a bit like that. In one role total vigilance is necessary; in the other, there’s nothing to do but hope for the best. A book, like those newborn turtles, will ride whatever wave takes it.

It’s deeply rewarding to me when I learn that something I wrote moved or inspired or entertained someone; and it’s crushing to hear that my writing bored or annoyed or enraged another. But an author has to stand back from both the praise and the criticism once a book is out in the world. The story I chose to write in Wild for no other reason than I felt driven to belongs to those who read it, not me. And yet I’ll never forget what it once was, long before I could even imagine how gloriously it would someday be swept away from me.


From Booklist

Echoing the ever-popular search for wilderness salvation by Chris McCandless (Back to the Wild, 2011) and every other modern-day disciple of Thoreau, Strayed tells the story of her emotional devastation after the death of her mother and the weeks she spent hiking the 1,100-mile Pacific Crest Trail. As her family, marriage, and sanity go to pieces, Strayed drifts into spontaneous encounters with other men, to the consternation of her confused husband, and eventually hits rock bottom while shooting up heroin with a new boyfriend. Convinced that nothing else can save her, she latches onto the unlikely idea of a long solo hike. Woefully unprepared (she fails to read about the trail, buy boots that fit, or pack practically), she relies on the kindness and assistance of those she meets along the way, much as McCandless did. Clinging to the books she lugs along—Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Adrienne Rich—Strayed labors along the demanding trail, documenting her bruises, blisters, and greater troubles. Hiker wannabes will likely be inspired. Experienced backpackers will roll their eyes. But this chronicle, perfect for book clubs, is certain to spark lively conversation. –Colleen Mondor
 

Posted by on December 15, 2012 in Book Club

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